home btn about btn awards btn
Buy Tickets for The Peccadillo Theater button
    audio visual
wilder christmas
Loss of Roses Silver Cord Btn
 
Ten Chimneys Btn Man Who Came to Dinner Btn

Theatre at St. Clement’s
December, 2015

“Blessings on The Peccadillo Theater Company for giving us A Wilder Christmas, a flawlessly staged double bill of rarely seen one-act plays by Thornton Wilder, that are as extraordinary in their own ways as Our Town... Dan Wackerman, the company's Artistic Director, has staged these plays with a warm simplicity that conceals supreme artfulness, adding discretely innovative touches that are as true to the spirit of the text as were David Cromer's more radical but equally convincing innovations in his great 2009 revival of Our Town... the 16-actor ensemble is right in every way... despite their comparative obscurity The Long Christmas Dinner and Pullman Car Hiawatha are miniature masterpieces at once poetic and profound, and I doubt you'll ever see either one done better.”
Wall Street Journal
“Profoundly humane... director Dan Wackerman insists that you hear Wilder's unforced modernism, his unashamed Americanism, his deep sympathy. You can catch, too, Wilder's profound influence on contemporary drama, from Tony Kushner to Paula Vogel, Will Eno, Dan LeFranc and more.”
The New Yorker
 
“Superlative! The Long Christmas Dinner and Pullman Car Hiawatha are the objects of fine revivals... Both plays are beauties and are acted accordingly by Wackerman's troupe.”
Huffington Post
 
   
“The theatrical equivalent of warming your feet by the fire–before a random breeze gives you a shiver. Dan Wackerman directs the plays, which combine formal daring and philosophical wonderment.”
Time Out New York
 
“A balanced combination of laughter and melancholy, A Wilder Christmas is a welcome gift.”
Curtain Up
“An early Christmas present, Thornton Wilder's The Long Christmas Dinner and Pullman Car Hiawatha are both scrumptious feasts and deserve to have two separate reviews as they are each drenched with so much flavor one needs many words to do justice to the creations... Dan Wackerman has directed both plays with a strong hand and skilled artistic vision. He manages to successfully create the worlds of each play and transports us magically into another time period. James Beaman... was commanding with a wonderfully observed performance as an 1840s gentleman. Giselle Wolf, as his religious and loving wife, was delicate and hearty at the same time. Brad Fryman as cousin Brandon gave us some delightful comedic moments to lighten the heavily laden family table. I particularly enjoyed John Pasha as Charles... a magnetic performer with a rich, resonant voice. Gael Schaefer played the distant relative with a captivating fragility. I loved Barbra Wendgerd as the spinster sister, Genevieve, who crafted a very emotionally engaging performance.”
NY Theatre Guide
“Under Dan Wackerman's direction, a fine cast lead by Michael Sean McGuinness' Stage Manager, brings to Wilder's vision [in Pullman Car Hiawatha] an odd amalgom of sadness and joy to life... The Long Christmas Dinner proves to be deeply moving. Wackerman's sensitive direction and a very solid cast are alive to each little nuance... A Wilder Christmas is the perfect holiday treat.”
Lighting & Sound America
“Director Dan Wackerman is unerringly true to Wilder's vision... Wengerd's portrayal is strong and beautifully nuanced. Her Genevieve changes from a pliant, idealistic girl to an assertive, ground-down elder... Stunning and inspiring.”
Theater Pizzazz
“Producing these forgotten gems is prohibitively expensive and risky. I regard Peccadillo's decision to grace their stage with these plays as an act of literary heroism... Both plays are profound, breathtaking and bound to occupy your mind for days after you see them. The real star of the evening is set and lighting designer Harry Feiner.”
Theatre Is Easy
“Both The Long Christmas Dinner and Pullman Car Hiawatha quietly and powerfully examine just how short our time on the planet actually is... Standouts among the cast... include Wolf as The Insane Woman, Sell as Harriet, McGuinness as the genial yet all-knowing Stage Manager, and Lamar Giles, who switches effortlessly between comic relief as a Pullman Porter and a more dramatic turn as an Archangel.”
Epoch Times
“A great gift to any friend, family member, young person new to theater, older person ready to give up any hope of ever again experiencing the past joy of seeing great theater, or most of all to yourself, is the wonderfully satisfying, creative and lovingly rendered Peccadillo Theater Company's A Wilder Christmas... a glorious evening of storytelling... One of the year's most enjoyable, satisfying and theatrical events... kudos to Dan Wackerman... for excellent work with this uniformly excellent ensemble cast.”
Intermission Talk
“There is a stillness to the production [of A Long Christmas Dinner] that creates an eerie voyeurism–something like the experience of rifling through long lost family photos... Pullman Car Hiawatha takes a turn toward the transcendental, and Peccadillo's translation of this portion of the evening is particularly powerful... It creates the kind of unnerving tranquility that can make the New York streets we spill into seem silly in their business.”
Stage Buddy
“Under Dan Wackerman's superb direction Peccadillo Theater Company's A Wilder Christmas... is a gem. Mr. Wackerman's unobtrusive style compliments the material; with unsentimental precision and a light touch he illuminates all the subtle little details of Wilder's works until they hum and vibrate, and we find ourselves lifted into a place buzzing with sublime energy.”
Stage and Cinema
The Long Christmas Dinner (1931) and Pullman Car Hiawatha (1930) together make for a rich sampling of Wilder's familiar themes of family and unavoidable specter of death (which, in Wilder, is only the beginning of another journey)... Harry Feiner... designed the exquisitely detailed lighting effects. The large cast is uniformly excellent.”
TheaterScene.net
“Harry Feiner's... set for The Long Christmas Dinner has a delicate, almost chilling beauty... Dan Wackerman's direction is lovely and he has a marvelous company of actors to work with... [These plays] twinkle with Wilder's wit and compassion.”
Edge Media Network

Theatre at St. Clement’s
February, 2015

Rocket to the Moon
“Rewards the curiosity of anyone with an interest in Odets... Jonathan Hadary [is] amusingly nettlesome [as Mr. Prince]. Cleo Singer [is] beautifully played by Katie McClellan. In this production, which is handsomely costumed by Amy C. Bradshaw, the center of gravity shifts to Cleo. That's what's striking here.”
New York Times
“The Peccadillo Theater Companies revival of Rocket to the Moon (1938) is smart winter programming. Odets'... characters are gifts to actors... our affections [swing] between Hadary's joyful bull-in-a-china-shop and Eisenberg's keen vulnerability.”
Time Out New York Critic's Pick!
Time Out New York
 
“Director Dan Wackerman shapes a vision of those on the precipice. Stark's struggles are achingly portrayed by Eisenberg, while McClellan nicely captures Cleo's vulnerability and longing. The Peccadillo Theater Company's solid revival is worth seeing.”
Huffington Post
 
   
“Eisenberg... does an excellent job playing an American Everyman in hard times. McClellan... is perfectly cast as a young woman so full of life and hope that she makes most of the downtrodden men around her feel alive and hopeful, too.”
The New Yorker
 
“A fascinating and timeless character study about people trapped by poor decisions and imperiled financial situations who dare to take charge of their own destinies... the acting is excellent all around... and Dan Wackerman's direction keeps the story focused.”
The Worleygig
“The Peccadillo Theater Company has finally and faithfully revived this rarely seen Odets play. Ned Eisenberg charmingly offers a focused portrait of amiability and despair as Ben Stark. Marilyn Matarrese brings empathy and dimension to the role of the frustrated and domineering Belle with her precise performance. With both very well played contrived haughtiness and tenderness, [McClellan] captures the essence of a young striver seeking to claw out of poverty on her own terms. Director Dan Wackerman has reverently recreated the look and sound of Odets.”
TheaterScene.net
“There isn't a weak link in this company of actors. At least four meltdowns are viscerally portrayed. Characters are alive in their skins as epitomized by physical mannerisms, accent, and behavior towards others. Director Dan Wackerman has done an excellent job of creating a naturalistic scenario. Scenic design by Harry Feiner is adroitly detailed and aptly worn down.”
Woman Around Town
“The cast... makes Odets' gloriously purple dialogue sound like real speech. Marilyn Matarrese makes Belle into a prize bully, then reveals her real vein of fear at her core... Larry Bull's Phil is a pitiable, scattered creature, full of nervous ticks. Michael Keyloun handles the ripest dialogue like a golden-era Hollywood pro.”
Lighting & Sound America
“It's something of a miracle how undated this play feels. Wackerman's production... provides a blessing for fans of Odets, who will get a chance to see a rarely performed Odets play on a professional scale.”
StageBuddy.com
“The Peccadillo Theater Company pulls off a powerful adaptation of [Rocket to the Moon]... making Odets' world strikingly accessible... Eisenberg is dynamic and believable as the bumbling dentist... McClellan makes a sympathetic case for his seductive secretary... Hadary is a true gem as Stark's wisecracking father-in-law... Magically, the set captures the restlessness of pre-WWII Manhattan within the constraint of a dentist's office.”
Center On The Aisle
“Matarrese plays the jilted wife like a wounded animal. Her words are her claws, poised to shred anyone who threatens the life she's created... McClellan convincingly portrays the ingenue making up for a troubled home life with fantastical lies about her family's wealth and privilege. Director Dan Wackerman makes her lack of power in this world terrifying and real.”
Theatremania.com
“It is good to report that an empowering thrust of energy, mainly the result of some very fine acting under the sturdy direction of Dan Wackerman, has helped to navigate a safe and sound landing for this Rocket... Eisenberg effectively captures Ben's meek and mild nature... Marilyn Matarrese registers strongly with a terrifically take-charge/no-nonsense presence as the shrewish wife...”
Curtain Up
“In watching Clifford Odets' Rocket to the Moon, which just opened at Theatre at St. Clement’s, we are reminded of what a brilliant writer Odets was... Director Dan Wackerman brings this era to life. The performance to watch here is Jonathan Hadary... Mr. Hadary brings a heart and realness to his role that makes you understand adultery and what an older man sees in a much younger relationship.”
Times Square Chronicles

Theatre at St. Clement’s
May, 2014

"And I reveled in any number of first-class revivals, including The Peccadillo Theater Company's triumphant exhumation of "A Loss of Roses," a powerful William Inge drama that hadn't been seen in New York since... 1959."
The Best Theatre of 2014

Wall Street Journal
“Under the direction of Dan Wackerman, the acting in this Peccadillo production of William Inge's drama from 1959 is stellar. The characters all have a stock quality at first, but the performers– particularly Kahre and Hedwall–deftly reveal them to be eccentric, complex, and very dark.”
The New Yorker
A LOSS OF ROSES is a classic worth revisiting... Director Dan Wackerman delivers a polished production of this old-fashioned drama... Lichty and Kahre make strong impressions as the ill-fated lovers, while Hedwall is moving as a woman desperate to keep her son close.”
New York Post
 
A LOSS OF ROSES is a strong and serious piece of work, and Dan Wackerman's understated staging helps reclaim a fine play that should never have slipped from sight!”
Wall Street Journal
 
   
“Hedwall is excellent as Helen, combining a no-nonsense approach to life with real empathy, while Kahre and Lichty's push/pull attraction is heartfelt... the play is solid, and the Peccadillo Theater Company has rightly revived it.”
Huffington Post
 
“Deborah Hedwall is excellent! Ben Kahre's Kenny blossoms into a creepy charmer!”
New York Times
“An impressive revival! Jean Lichty is especially poignant and deeply moving!”
New York Calling
“This is an extraordinary revival and anyone who sees it will discover a treasure! Beautifully directed by Dan Wackerman and stunningly designed by Harry Feiner. Do not miss this wonderful lost play!”
Theater Pizzazz
“Jean Lichty's voice and look are reminiscent of the late Jill Clayburgh and she brings a strong commitment to Lila... Deborah Hedwall... shines as a concerned single mother struggling to push her resistant son out of the nest. Artistic Director Dan Wackerman guides the production with a solid appreciation for Inge's work and the rhythms of small-town life. Everything about their production looks and feels right.”
Edge Magazine
“A whisper of Tennessee Williams floats through The Peccadillo Theater Company's polished revival of A Loss of Roses, one of playwright William Inge's lesser known works... [All] three lead actors... give solid performances.”
Talkin' Broadway
“The tightness of the mother-son fox-trot is expressed right off the bat in the ordinary, familiar, but heavily subtexted kitchen-table dialog that Inge has a genius for, and which director Dan Wackerman directs respectfully and handily... Ben Kahre plays Kenny brightly and believably as a good looking and broad-shouldered wastrel... but... it is rotten-luck Lila – soulfully rendered by Ms. Lichty – who wins our protectiveness.”
Center On The Aisle
“I always love what Dan Wackerman does with the Peccadillo. I've never seen them give a bad production.”
Hi! Drama
   

Theatre at St. Clement’s
June, 2013

“Mom's a drag in lively The Silver Cord. Haul out the evil mother-in-law jokes; Mrs. Phelps is a real doozy! Beautiful costumes and a well-appointed set by Harry Feiner provide a lovely background for the tense drama. The final act is an exciting, knock-down, drag-out verbal confrontation!”
Associated Press
“An absorbing play... excitingly presented. As designed by Harry Feiner and directed by Dan Wackerman, The Silver Cord is... solid silver.”
John Simon
“This well-made but mesmerizing play, possibly the most Freudian play ever written in America, explodes the myth of mother-love as a positive element in a man's life. Dan Wackerman's flawless revival will have you riveted to your seat as this engrossing production unfolds and keeps you enthralled by its twists and turns. With Dale Carman as a memorably possessive Mrs. Phelps and Victoria Mack as her rival for her older son's affection as his fiancée, this is one of the best revivals to reach the New York stage in many years. The final climactic scene in which Christina verbally duels Mrs. Phelps for her husband is the stuff of high drama. The Peccadillo production is remarkable! Not only has Sidney Howard's The Silver Cord stood the test of time, but the Peccadillo Theater Company's production reveals how timeless it is. Dan Wackerman's revival is a model of what a revival of play from another era ought to be. Dale Carman's Mrs. Phelps is a classic of constraint and venom.”
TheaterScene.net
“A must-see production! Director Dan Wackerman has taken a major risk here by casting a male actor as Mrs. Phelps. Dale Carman gives a restrained and nuanced performance. Carman is so good in the part that, at moments, I nearly forgot about the drag aspect of the casting. They hit the jackpot with Wilson Bridges and Thomas Matthew Kelley, who truly look like blood brothers. Both of them successfully depict the stunted emotional life of adult children who've been badgered and bullied their entire lives by a seemingly mild-mannered woman who is in fact a full-fledged tyrant.”
Simply Showbiz
“Mrs. Phelps, the central figure of Sidney Howard's 1926 domestic shocker, follows a philosophy that might best be described as: Have them. Smother them. Eat them alive. It took about five minutes before I realized that Mrs. Phelps was being played by a man (Dale Carman, gotten up in tweeds and a gray wig, greeting everyone with an absolutely lethal smile.) This might seem a strange choice for an otherwise straightforward revival, but it is the key to Dan Wackerman's production. Howard's script, steeped in the pop Freudian concepts of the 1920s, makes it abundantly clear that in her heart Mrs. Phelps desires to marry one or both of her sons. The script's deadly serious treatment of this situation may seem outlandish, but it stops short of camp. Howard was a master craftsman, and even at its most ridiculous, The Silver Cord remains surprisingly watchable. The Silver Cord may be an artifact of another theatrical era, but it is a fascinating one, with a hair-raising central figure, and Wackerman's production gives it a fair airing. Good thing they waited until after Mother's Day to open it.
Lighting & Sound America
“You forget almost immediately that you're watching a male actor play a female role because Dale Carman inhabits Mrs. Phelps with such delicacy, such insight, such control that it's obvious he's lived with the part for a long time and knows all its levels, all its traps, all its opportunities. This is a piece of theater history that has been restored with great love, respect and skill.”
The L Magazine
Mommie Dearest has nothing on Mrs. Phelps in Sidney Howard's 1926 play The Silver Cord. Far from a stereotypical cartoon, this mother is pathologically possessive, taking mother love for her two sons dangerously over-the-top. The humor is incisively dark. The Peccadillo Theater Company's vibrant presentation of this rarely seen play is currently in a limited run at St. Clement's Church. OBIE Award winner, Dan Wackerman, keeps a snappy pace. Costumes by Gail Cooper-Hecht are period perfect.”
Curtain Up
“Based on Dale Carman's amusing, stiff-necked, autocratic posturing and posing, the solidly written play happily doesn't descend into camp.”
Simon Saltzman, President – Outer Critics Circle
“Dan Wackerman directs [The Silver Cord] with a fast pace and not a bit of anachronistic camp. All the performers are wonderful, but Dale Carman's is especially bravura."”
Hi Drama

Theatre at St. Clement’s
September, 2012

“Jeffrey Hatcher provides generous doses of arch quipping in the Coward mold. Mr. Hatcher's affection for the Lunts and the golden age of American theater shines throughout. Ms. McCormick radiates lissome glamour as Lynn.”
Charles Isherwood, New York Times
Ten Chimneys is a charming, frothy off-Broadway production from The Peccadillo Theater Company. Jeffrey Hatcher has filled his story with witty period humor, often achieving an air of glittering lightness reminiscent of Noel Coward. Witticisms fly like darts! Director Dan Wackerman's skilled staging and unhurried pace let the plot unfold naturally, like its languid summer setting. Carolyn McCormick easily inhabits her larger-than-life character, and her brittle, self-aware delivery renders her pointed banter deliciously acerbic. Byron Jennings is debonair as Lunt. McCormick masterfully conveys Fontanne's no-longer-young character's realistic yet rueful feelings. Lucy Martin is wildly funny as Hattie, Lunt's smothering prima donna of a mother.”
Associated Press
“The always elegant Byron Jennings and the beautiful Carolyn McCormick have a wonderful chemistry together. Michael McCarty is terrific as Sydney Greenstreet. Director Dan Wackerman's polished staging features striking sets by Harry Feiner.”
New York Post
“The enjoyable comedy Ten Chimneys glows with an affectionate warmth. Byron Jennings nails the carriage and diction of an old-style thespian. Carolyn McCormick brings elegance and wit and throws herself in the role of Lynn Fontanne. Dan Wackerman directs and guides the good-looking production for The Peccadillo Theater Company. The storied stage couple, the Lunts, live again!”
New York Daily News
“Just blocks from the electronic frenzy of Times Square, you can slip into a gentler age and pretend that the 21st century never happened. Hatcher's play offers a grand opportunity to see first-rate real-life husband-and-wife actors Byron Jennings and Carolyn McCormick performing together as legendary real-life husband-and-wife actors Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne. A superb showcase for Carolyn McCormick, who balances Lynn's diva moments with the frailties of someone vexed by her limitations.”
Time Out New York
“Designer Harry Feiner has crafted an authentic and charmingly cozy set that feels lived in by the show's seven-member ensemble cast, who portray these attractive and flamboyant historical figures with fluid direction by Dan Wackerman. I'd move in tomorrow! Jeffrey Hatcher's dialogue offers insight into the relationship of a complicated couple. I'd suggest this production as a must-visit!”
Back Stage
“Jeffrey Hatcher has written a new play fashioned in the grand manner and in the best tradition of the comedies of Kaufman and Hart called Ten Chimneys – a Peccadillo Theatre Company production under the astute direction of Dan Wackerman. Bravo! – for keeping the well made play tradition alive with a fresh and funny production that takes us into the private lives of that dynamic theatrical duo – Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne – married and acting side by side as are the actors portraying them – Byron Jennings and Carolyn McCormick filling their shoes superbly giving exceptional performances. They rehearse with hysterical results and some wonderful barbs and sarcastic remarks by the lovely Miss McCormick as the delicate English lady looking ravishing in the gowns supplied by designer Sam Fleming. The handsome, elaborate and detailed set by Harry Feiner is excellent! The dialogue sparkles with wit. Enlightening, charming and thoroughly entertaining!"
Talk Entertainment
“Quite good! Terrific production! A wonderful showcase for two great actors: Carolyn McCormick as Lynn and Byron Jennings as Alfred. Recommended. Very entertaining! Dan Wackerman, who always does wonderful work, directed it very nicely. Byron Jennings and Carolyn McCormick are wonderful. The acting is superb!”
Broadway Radio
Ten Chimneys paints an affectionate show-biz portrait. Michael McCarty delivers a spot-on impression of Sydney Greenstreet. Dan Wackerman provides a handsome production with a charmingly-detailed setting by Harry Feiner that nicely suggests the elegant rusticity of the Lunts' Wisconsin retreat.”
Michael Sommers, New Jersey Newsroom
“Byron Jennings and Carolyn McCormick have rich energy and an irreplaceable authenticity. A delight! Outstanding!”
Talkin' Broadway
“Exhilarating! One of the best plays of the new season! Splendid! Rollicking! Jeffrey Hatcher's razor-sharp dialogue is fanciful and whip smart, wonderfully playing with theatrical conventions and revealing tantalizing secrets. Dan Wackerman's direction is breezy and inviting. Ten Chimneys is a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at Lunt and Fontanne. Great fun, romantic and insightful, a must-see for lovers of theater.”
This Week in New York
“Clever! Designer Harry Feiner fills the stage with a lovely cottage that would give most playgoers a severe case of real estate envy. Byron Jennings, a familiar Broadway face who specializes in playing elegant period gentlemen, is a perfect choice to play Alfred Lunt. Carolyn McCormick handles the light comedy of her role very well. Julie Bray makes the character of Uta Hagen both naive and ambitiously flirtatious. Director Dan Wackerman's genial production is lathered with froth and style!”
Broadway World
“Jeffrey Hatcher's new comedy Ten Chimneys is a welcome romp. Charming! Byron Jennings and his real-life wife Carolyn McCormick give deliciously grand turns as Lunt and Fontanne!”
Next Magazine
“Jeffrey Hatcher's backstage drama, smoothly directed by Dan Wackerman, has the excellent Byron Jennings and Carolyn McCormick as the legendary acting couple. Interesting and entertaining! Byron Jennings is an aptly suave Alfred. Carolyn McCormick's Lynn is an all glittery, glamorous diva (Take a bow, costumer Sam Fleming).”
Curtain Up
“Amusing and insightful! It's fun to watch these two pros drop their rivalry to bat ideas around, and, when they arrive at a satisfactory conclusion, their joy is infectious. Byron Jennings and Carolyn McCormick as the Lunts realize these glamorous monsters with considerable brio. McCormick is especially beguiling when swanning around displaying her great lady airs. Jennings' Alfred is a similarly exquisite creature Michael McCarty is a remarkably convincing Sydney Greenstreet, capturing his unctuous delivery and sardonic manner. Lucy Martin makes the most of her acid-tipped observations as Hattie. This is surely the most elaborate Peccadillo production ever. Harry Feiner's lighting adds an extra touch of glamour to the proceedings. Sam Fleming's costumes wittily contrast Lynn's haute couture and Hattie's eccentric outfits with the everyday wear of the others.”
Lighting & Sound America
“Witty! This clever, charming throwback in time is filled with banter, nit-picking and speculation. Bryon Jennings exudes all the charisma of the great Alfred Lunt. Carolyn McCormick embodies the regal, sinewy Lynn Fontanne. Jennings and McCormick are deliciously charismatic! Julia Bray shows depth, passion and understanding of her character. Costumes by Sam Fleming bring the 30s/40s time period to life as director Dan Wackerman massages the actors through this historical era with witty abandon, making this an enjoyable Noel Coward-esque comedy.”
The Examiner
“Playwright Jeffrey Hatcher writes intelligent dialogue spiked with gloriously pithy zingers. The piece is filled with wonderful theater details. Carolyn McCormick (Lynn Fontanne) is an elegant sylph in her character's skin. She's both fierce and vulnerable. Byron Jennings (Alfred Lunt) is sympathetic and believable. His delight with dramatic suggestions that work is palpable. Michael McCarty (Sydney Greenstreet) is excellent. Whether sallying a piquant retort or coping with his wife's illness, he never less than fully inhabits the role. Director Dan Wackerman orchestrates beautifully. Harry Feiner's Scenic and Lighting Design is wonderfully atmospheric. Costume Design by Sam Fleming is evocative of era, class and particular character.”
Woman Around Town
“Involving! Byron Jennings is perfectly cast as a great actor.”
WBGO Radio
“Enjoyable! Fans of the legend of the Lunts, or simply of backstage comedy in general, will find plenty to enjoy.”
Gay Socialites
“Just what the doctor ordered during this holiday season! Peccadillo's Artistic Director Dan Wackerman keeps the mayhem under control with aplomb... Plenty of laughs and silliness to spare... Laugh and enjoy!”
Examiner.com
 
“Lucy Martin is terrific. Credit director Dan Wackerman with the elegant and graceful production. Ten Chimneys is a valentine to the theater as well as a loving tribute to the Lunts and their circle.”
TheaterScene.net
 
 
Ten Chimneys Fallin
Ken Fallin, Playbill Online
 

Theatre at St. Clement’s
December, 2011

“Merry, mirthful, and laugh out loud funny!... A talented cast of 24 creates a wonderfully farcical atmosphere under the sure direction of Dan Wackerman... Jim Brochu is a master of the wide-eyed stare and expressive double take... The diminutive, very comical Joseph R. Sicari channels his inner Jimmy Durante to great effect... The Peccadillo Theater Company's amusing revival of The Man Who Came to Dinner holds great appeal.”
Associated Press
“Peccadillo Theater's production of the glorious Kaufman and Hart 1939 comedy The Man Who Came to Dinner is fast and fizzy... Sheridan Whiteside, played with relish by Jim Brochu is fun to watch!... The wonderful Cady Huffman, who won the TONY for The Producers, vamps with glee... All the plots and subplots come together in a terrific climax, aided by Harry Feiner's sets, Amy Pedigo-Otto's spot-on costumes and a strong ensemble cast. The Man Who Came to Dinner is a triumph of literate playwriting, a smart and sassy holiday treat.”
Huffington Post
“Director Dan Wackerman guides a cast of over 20 actors with screwball flair... Jim Brochu brings his own brand of ebullience to the role of Sheridan Whiteside... There isn't a flaw in the non-stop frivolity... The gags explode like firecrackers on the Fourth of July!”
Theatremania.com
“The Peccadillo Theater Company's new production of The Man Who Came to Dinner... is pitch and period perfect... There probably isn't a better actor for this part than [Jim] Brochu who was clearly born to play Whiteside... The rest of the cast are superb... not since the giant repertory company that was golden age Hollywood has an actor so perfectly portrayed the confusion, the middle-class hopefulness and red-faced bumbling as Mr. [Tony] Triano. He is the cherry on top of this delightful sundae... Director Dan Wackerman shepherds the cast expertly.”
TheatreScene.com
“Director Dan Wackerman keeps the pace quick and definitely manages the 30+ characters who breeze through Harry Feiner's impeccable set during the course of the evening... The Man Who Came to Dinner is a lighthearted romp for the holiday season, a great night out!”
Curtainup.com
“John Windsor-Cunningham's Beverly Carlton, cleverly modeled on Noel Coward, is elegant and amusing, and Joseph R. Sicari's Banjo, an unholy amalgam of Jimmy Durante and Harpo Marx, all but walks off with the third act with his boisterous clowning... The cast cavorts merrily on a lavish set by Harry Feiner that's mighty impressive.”
Backstage
“There were lots of other delights to be found Off Broadway... One of the most delightful could almost be viewed as a Christmas present, since it opened on December 4th: The Peccadillo Theater Company's production of the classic Kaufman & Hart comedy The Man Who Came to Dinner, praiseworthy for the stellar work of Jim Brochu and a strong cast as well as for Broadway-caliber set design, costumes, and lighting -- all of this for an extremely low ticket price. I don't know how they did it.”
BroadwayStars.com
“Just what the doctor ordered during this holiday season! Peccadillo's Artistic Director Dan Wackerman keeps the mayhem under control with aplomb... Plenty of laughs and silliness to spare... Laugh and enjoy!”
Examiner.com

Theatre at St. Clement’s
March, 2011

“Compelling... Wonderful... a mix of peppy, melting-pot comedy and pitch-black tragedy... with a lovely score by Arthur Schwartz and Dorothy Fields from the golden age of Broadway.”
New York Times
“Does a tree still grow in Brookyln? A poignant revival of a musical about struggling upward from poverty reminds us that yes, it can... Wackerman has found a talented cast to perform this unusual mix of comedy and melodrama which has been rarely performed over the years. Handsome ne'er-do-well Johnny... is played with an abundance of charm by Jim Stanek, whose strong tenor and expressiveness are well-suited to this role. His soaring voice is masterful... Elizabeth Loyacano also sings beautifully as Katie, particularly the heartfelt ballad, Make the Man Love Me... Cissy is portrayed with brass and sass by Klea Blackhurst, who ably belts out the show's best-known comedic tune, He Had Refinement... The lovely songs of Schwartz and Fields hold up extremely well, and Peccadillo presents an appealing, spirited presentation of a classic American story.”
Associated Press
“Sumptuous score... crowd-pleasing... chilling... The proper elements to not only charm but also profoundly tug theatregoers' heartstrings... a feat often accomplished thanks to a fine cast... Equally impressive is Kristen Blodgette's musical direction and the work of conductor William Waldrop.”
Theatremania.com
“Bouyant... Enchanting... The Peccadillo Theater Company's new revival has a warm nostalgic glow... a lovely score and thoughtfully revised book.”
New York Post
“Entrancing. A beautiful, well-executed production that brings the audience back to a colorful period in the history of New York City.”
Curtainup.com
“This is an ideal project for the Peccadillo Theater Company, whose mission is to rediscover works of classic American theater that are not regularly revived. Not only are they taking on a relevant work in this vein, they are in essence, restoring it.”
NYTheatre.com
“... a solid production by the Peccadillo Theater Company with the troupe's Artistic Director, Dan Wackerman, directing a well-chosen cast studded with strong singers... As the luckless Johnny Nolan, the strong-voiced Jim Stanek is a stand-out in the Peccadillo staging. Elizabeth Loyacano's Katie is sung with purity and grace... As Cissy, Klea Blackhurst delivers her songs and gets her laughs without ever upsetting the production's balance as Shirley Booth did in 1951.”
Irish Echo

Theatre at St. Clement’s
June, 2010

“Lillian Hellman’s prequel to 'The Little Foxes' convincingly explains how the monstrous Regina Hubbard Giddens... got that way... An intense, highly enjoyable production… the performances are impeccably forceful.”
New York Times
“Hellman's dialogue... crackle[s] with wit- the melodrama increasingly reads as camp and very enjoyably so- and the actors manage to wring both sympathy and humor from their despicable characters. Lavinia [is] brilliantly played by Elizabeth Norment.”
The New Yorker
“Dan Wackerman's production, on a spacious, effective set by Joseph Spirito, handles this demanding script effectively... That the play seems intense rather than overdone or crude indicates how well its spirit has been caught: Its sheer nastiness, its open negativity convey an almost tonic exhilaration. The acting, overall, is solid... Howard, forceful yet varied, almost mercurial, as the patriarch, comes off best; Norment and Curtis second him particularly well.”
Village Voice
“A terrific production of a terrific play… see if you can take your eyes off Dan Wackerman's production...  one of the best theatrical events of the decade.”
Theatremania.com
“If you want an evening of pure entertainment in the theater head over to the Peccadillo Theater Company’s production of Another Part of the Forest and delight... Director Dan Wackerman has put together a cast of outstanding actors, perfectly suited to their roles in what may be the most enjoyable show currently running in New York.”
Show Business Weekly
“Delectable…served up with zest…filled with a number of terrific performances.”
Theatremania.com
“An accomplished production of a significant play…Thanks again to Peccadillo for rescuing yet another gem from obscurity.”
NYTheatre.com
“... a corker of a melodrama filled with colorful dialogue and well plotted one-upsmanship throughout. Fluidly directed by Dan Wackerman... For those who know and admire The Little Foxes this will be a particular treat.”
DCTheaterScene.com

“The Peccadillo Theatre Company... has come roaring back with a superb production of Lillian Hellman’s Another Part of the Forest... Peccadillo’s production, beautifully directed by Dan Wackerman, makes a fine case for this play as a forgotten American classic, and the actors are just wonderful. Sherman Howard is appalling (and I mean that in a good way) as the vile Marcus, and Matthew Floyd Miller is brilliantly devious as Benjamin."
PlayFixer.com
“... a taut, compelling drama brought vividly to life by The Peccadillo Theater Company under the direction of Dan Wackerman. Filled with Hellman's trademark stings and arrows... it's delicious fun to watch the carnage unfold. It's smartly cast and crisply performed, and when you're done with the Hubbards you'll be grateful your family isn't as dysfunctional as theirs!"
Next Magazine

Theatre at St. Clement’s
December, 2009

D•R•2 Theatre
February, 2010 - May, 2010

Actor's Temple Theatre
June, 2010 - ongoing

“Singularly captivating. Zero Hour is a success. Brochu is the spitting image of the bearish Mostel, down to the strands of hair barely covering his head. His wildly expressive gestures are particularly spot on. It brings Mostel back to life, just the way his fans want him.”
New York Times
“It all flows and provides plenty of big laughs as well as hushed drama. After a while, you stop caring whether a particular line is Brochu’s or Mostel’s; all you know is that you’ve been privy to the work of a great comedian.”
The New Yorker
“We owe Jim Brochu a debt of gratitude for Zero Hour, an extraordinary act of reincarnation that restores the outsize actor to us in all of his daunting dimensions. From the moment that Brochu spins around to face the audience, he is a Hirschfeld drawing come to pulsing life! You can’t help being swept up in the tornado of energy as Brochu’s star turn conjures forth a Zero larger than life and death.”
Time Out New York
“Frequently funny and always engaging, Brochu evokes the kind of prickle on the back of the neck usually delivered by David Lynch movies.”
Variety
“The rumors of Zero Mostel's death have apparently been greatly exaggerated. Jim Brochu recalls his subject so uncannily in looks, voice and anarchic spirit that one immediately wants to see him in revivals of "Forum" and "Fiddler." Thirty-two years after Mostel's untimely death, it's a pleasure to have him back on the boards.”
New York Post
“Very funny. Brochu's living restoration has brought Mostel's larger-than-life personality back into the spotlight for a laugh-filled, much-welcomed presentation."
Associated Press

Theatre at St. Clement’s
September, 2008

“The Peccadillo Theater, under the direction of Dan Wackerman, is known for burnishing forgotten gems. Johnny On A Spot would seem to be well with-in their area of expertise ... with a brilliant comic turn by Margery Beddow, as a Southern cathouse madam, this revival of Charles MacArthur’s 1942 political farce follows a Southern governor’s well-oiled run for senate, a campaign that continues merrily on long after the illustrious governor drops dead. He gets elected anyway, despite his lack of a pulse. Viewers of the recent Republican Convention may experience a jolt of deja vu.”
The New Yorker
“Any play that includes the cry ‘Politics isn’t women’s business!’ is certainly of the moment. The fact that Johnny On A Spot is set on the eve of a senatorial election and scandal is involved makes it even more topical. Charles MacArthur’s spirited satire of Southern politics first saw the light in 1942, but it seems that politicians and scandal form a twosome that still insists on going steady ... The production is from the estimable Peccadillo Theater Company ... this agressively physical farce has enough spin to make you dizzy. Such turns as a prison inmate who finds God, a severe case of rigor mortis, and swooping birds of prey help keep the plot revolving until final curtain ... Ably supported by the attractive [Ellen] Zolezzi, [Carter] Roy adroitly drives the play’s engine, serving as the linchpin of the production. The crazy comedic style demanded by the proceedings is indeed a small gem.”
Back Stage
“The best script on my week’s itinerary, produced by the company from which I expect most, was Charles MacArthur’s 1942 farce, Johnny On A Spot, a sublimely cynical (and divinely up-to-date) study of crooked electorial shenanigans down South.”
Village Voice
“Fans of door-slamming farce or theater history will find much to appreciate. As always, Peccadillo doesn’t skimp on bodies. The 2-hour, 20-minute romp features 16 actors. Mark Manley as pliant Judge Webster and Ellen Zolezzi as the governor’s honest secretary are standouts. The actors are in splendid pastel costumes by Gail Cooper-Hecht, on a regal set by Joseph Spirito.”
Bloomberg News
“The cast’s performances range from good to excellent, demonstrating the precision line delivery, fearless goofiness, and over-the-top physicality needed to make screwball comedy work. As Barbara Webster, the cunningly ditsy and lovelorn niece of a corrupt judge, Laura Daniel shows off each of these attributes to perfect comic effect, crafting the play’s standout performance. Ellen Zolezzi, who portrays Julie Glynn, Governor Upjohn’s sarcastic, though loyal secretary devastatingly deadpans her way through Johnny On A Spot... Director Dan Wackerman keeps everything properly manic and, not to be undervalued, coherent.

Although Wackerman’s direction is solid, he is most impressive as the Peccadillo’s artistic director. It takes admirable integrity to execute a production that broadens your audience’s historical appreciation of theater, while also risking the alienation of this audience in the process. Of course Wackerman could have excised a few characters and some dialogue, sanitizing Johnny On A Spot and thus avoiding potential controversy, but his choice was braver. Wackerman respected his audience’s intelligence, allowing it to judge for itself MacArthur’s strengths and faults.”

EDGE New York City
“... Margery Beddow [gives a] wonderful portrayal of Pearl LaMonte, the late governor’s girlfriend and proprietor of the establishment where he met his untimely demise ... In addition to Beddow, other standouts in the show include [Dale] Carman as Doc, (who gets the final laugh of the play), and Wayne Henry as Pepi Pisano, a bodyguard for the Governor. Also worthy of mention are [Mark] Manley as Judge Webster and Robert O’Gorman as the Commissioner of Public Works ... The set by Joseph Spirito is lovely, giving the feeling of opulence required for the Governor’s offices, while Gail Cooper-Hecht’s costumes nicely evoke the period depicted.”
Epoch Times
Bank Street Theatre
July, 2007
[Morning Star] “is warm-hearted and sentimental but with a pinch of spice that keeps the plot’s melodramas and bromides from cloying. The set (designed by Joseph Spirito) is attractive and the dialogue ... has a tartness to it... Under the able direction of Dan Wackerman, the Peccadillo Theater Company brings a rough-edged spunk to the working class roles.”
The New Yorker
[Morning Star] “is involving... driven by rapid entrances and exits, slammed doors, tirades, sudden needs for air and life-shattering external events. Director Dan Wackerman doesn’t get in the way of the locomotive, but lets if rip through the theater. [Susan] Greenhill, in a role created by Molly Picon, makes for an endearingly human center of the saga ... Like a good Jewish mother [Syliva] Regan knew enough not to let her actors or the audience leave hungry.”
Time Out New York
“... audiences in the market for unassuming old-style entertainment with juicy characters and plenty of schmaltz are likely to find Morning Star mighty pleasing.”
Variety
[Wackerman has] “assembled a pleasant cast to tread set designer Joseph Spirito’s cheerfully cluttered boards... Standouts include newcomer Darcy Yellin as Fanny, Steve Sterner as the amorous tenant Aaron and Susan Greenhill as Becky... Wackerman hits the jokes hard, but he also emphasizes the play’s sentimentality, sending audience members, and even the occasional critic, scrabbling in their bags for tissues.”
Village Voice
“Director Dan Wackerman... clearly has a strong affection and feel for these vintage plays... he has elicited good work from the performers, who manage to convey a truthful feel for the period...”
New York Post
“Director Dan Wackerman... clearly has a strong affection and feel for these vintage plays... he has elicited good work from the performers, who manage to convey a truthful feel for the period...”
New York Post
“... the production uses the family dynamic to great advantage... Wackerman’s use of the set (excellently designed by Joseph Spirito) is masterful... [Morning Star] crackles with wit, energy, and genuine pathos...”
Curtainup.com

Bank Street Theatre
July, 2006

SoHo Playhouse
November, 2006 -- April, 2007

Room Service Peccadillo
“The Peccadillo Theater Company has its very entertaining production of the 1930’s comedy Room Service revved up to warp speed … Only professionals, like the ones at work here, can maintain a frenetic pace while remaining completely in control. Only total committment ... can sell such empty-headed stuff. The Marx Brothers apparently didn’t bring that to their 1938 film version ... but the Peccadillo cast does. Scott Evans makes a fine young innocent from Oswego ... and Dale Carman as the hotel’s beleagured manager looks as if steam might shoot out of his ears at any moment. The most admirable performance of the bunch, though, comes from Fred Burman... he turns a throwaway moment... into a show-stopping bit of comedy... credit Dan Wackerman, the director, with knowing how to make sure key lines and plot turns aren’t lost in the blur.”
New York Times
“Peccadillo Theatre presents a suave and cunning revival of the 1937 show-biz farce… under the able direction of Dan Wackerman, the thirties gags receive the proper period accents, making for some colorful and outrageous antics.”
The New Yorker
“Peccadillo's two 2005 offerings, Counsellor-at-Law and Ladies of the Corridor, both had Off Broadway commercial transfers. Room Service, which probably generates more laughs than any nonmusical in town, seems a candidate to do the same.”
Variety
“The Peccadillo Theater Company production [of Room Service], staged by their gifted artistic director, Dan Wackerman gets things gloriously right. Every outmoded period costume, wacky intonation, breakneck manuveur is on target; Both the times and the timing are cannily captured... The leads are flawless... Room Service is nearly 70 years old, but in this youthful production it capers as frolicsomely as the sassiest pup.”
John Simon, Bloomberg News
“I'd be hard-pressed to imagine a funnier, more loving production than the Peccadillo Theater Company's. Director Dan Wackerman drives a polished, smooth-running machine at full speed, steady even when it looks as though the wheels might come off. With such seamless ensemble work, it's a disservice to single out a performer."
Village Voice
“Farce is the trickiest of theatrical genres to pull off -- it requires on-the-nose timing and cocksure bravado -- but this production, directed with zany aplomb by Dan Wackerman, is funny enough to take your mind off anything short of a death sentence.”
Wall Street Journal
“Probably the best opportunity New Yorkers will get this summer to really laugh—that gleeful, guffawing kind of laughter. For this comic vehicle is sturdily built and… under Dan Wackerman’s rapid-transit direction, the play is given a rollicking revival that would make the authors, John Murray and Allen Boretz, smile. It’s also remarkably well cast, and when the cast begins singing “Abide With Me,” it’s the icing on a delicious comic cake.”
Back Stage
“Director Dan Wackerman has baked a nearly perfect theatrical soufflé. Wackerman previously proved his mastery of this period two years ago with his outstanding revival of Elmer Rice's Counsellor-at-Law. All that any ticket buyer looking for a good time needs to know is that with Room Service, Wackerman has done it again.”
Theatremania.com
“This is absolutely as good as it gets.”
CurtainUp.com
“I dare you to find a funnier two hours in town than this gem of a production.”
BroadwayWorld.com
Bank Street Theatre
November, 2004

Oak Room
Algonquin Hotel
May, 2005 - August 2006
“Frothy! ... The Talk of the Town draws from a sizable reservoir of snappy remarks... A singing and dancing anthology.”
New York Times
“Ginny Redington and Tom Dawes's well-crafted period-style songs are genuinely clever, and the classic quips briskly deployed throughout, still crackle.”
The New Yorker
[The Talk of the Town is] “a marvelous original musical... Everything about the show is remarkable, starting with the casting... Redington and Dawes have gone beyond the brittle comedy for which the Algonquin-ites are so fondly remembered to suggest that the lives beneath the brittle surface were full of frustration... The show has been sensitively directed by Dan Wackerman and elegantly choreographed by Mercedes Ellington. It captures the spirit of New York at a particularly dazzling moment.”
Daily News
“What a pleasure for a critic to be able to like a show not only from top to bottom, but also from side to side... [The show is] called The Talk of the Town, and that’s what it should be... you’d swear it is [the actual members of the Algonquin Roundtable] you see and hear, so very much like their prototypes are the splendid singing actors who impersonate -- no, embody them. The lyrics are cunning... and the music matches the words. It manages to be clever, melancholy, sentimental, biting, and heart-wrenching... And the book [is] a canny gleaning of these funny folks’ best witticisms ... the way Dan Wackerman has directed, and Mercedes Ellington moved around, the actors brings out every scintilla of their talent at its most scintillating.”
John Simon, Bloomberg News
“Dan Wackerman’s direction makes the most of [the Oak Room] space, and his cast -- including the tart Kristin Maloney as Parker, the suave Jarod Bradshow as Benchley, and the flavorful Donna Coney Island as Ferber -- acts well and sings even better.”
Time Out New York
[Chris Weikel] “displays all the effervescence and comic timing I’ve known him for and also proves himself every bit Maloney’s equal in delving into his character’ more tender side... The score... is marvelously understated, and their lyrics are nearly as clever as all those famous quotes -- no small feat! ... old fashioned New York elegance is still alive -- and still fun!”
New York Blade
“What Fresh Musical is This? Sure to become a favorite among connoisseurs of scathing Manhattan wit. It's hard to imagine another musical within a thousand mile radius of the Algonquin's Rose Room which can match The Talk of the Town for cleverness, sophistication and period tunefulness. We need stuff like this on Broadway.”
BroadwayWorld.com
“A tuneful score that captures the group's buoyant highs as well as the inevitable lows with lyrics that honor the characters' spirit and wit.” [Selected as one of the Best of 2004]
CurtainUp.com
“Delightfully entertaining. Whimsical! Naughty! Crisply directed. A captivating cast. The music captures the spirit of the Round Table as deftly as do the spoken words. This playfully glowing gem deserves a long and healthy life of its own after this run.”
NYTheatre.com
From On The Road...
“If you love good musical-comedy theater, get thee to Richardson's Eisemann Center...Peccadillo's production, with an all-Equity cast and spiffy musical accompaniment by Mark Janas, is a pure delight...The lyrics are especially winning, in a Stephen Sondheim by way of Meredith Wilson by way of Forbidden Broadway tone...The cast also excels, particularly Kristin Maloney as the arch but lovelorn Dorothy Parker. Her Act 2 number, The Faces That We Wear, could easily be a pop hit..."
The Dallas Morning News
“--what we got at the Eisemann tonight was a thoroughly enjoyable and witty musical review...The performers have been living these characters for some time and are, across the board, excellent actors and singers.
Pegasus News (Dallas/Forth Worth)
Bank Street Theatre
May, 2004

Theatre at St. Clement’s
January - March, 2005
"Entertainment in abundance radiates from the sparkling new production of the old Elmer Rice drama, Counsellor-At-Law... Admirably carpentered and briskly paced ... throbs with New York life and brims with touchstones of another time... [Counsellor-At-Law is] given rich life by the Tony Award winning John Rubinstein (Children of a Lesser God) at the head of a splendid cast of 20 ... Under the direction of Dan Wackerman, Simon is a loveably imperfect up-from-the-streets victor in the race to capture the American Dream... The play and the players make the audience care.”
New York Times
"[A] “revelation... Rice’s large-scale piece... turns out to be nearly as fine in its brash way as the half dozen best American plays... Using 20 actors in 23 roles... Wackerman not only kept the traffic orderly and the pace breakneck, but built at least half a dozen performances of major substance. The show belongs to its title character; John Rubinstein, pacing and growling, evoked the jut-jawed bulldog tenacity of late-period Cagney. High among his most able supporters were Mary Carver, as his mother, Lanie MacEwan, as the ultimate faithful secretary... and Tara Sands... as the office’s frenetic receptionist... That Wackerman... could not only bring off Rice’s busy mosaic, but also give it a contemporary vividness without trashing its period tone, suggests that he has both love and respect for our predecessors...”
Village Voice
"In this polished revival of Elmer Rice’s 1939 drama, the Tony-winning actor John Rubinstein gives a dynamic performance as a Jewish society lawyer in a profession dominated by white-shoe Wasps... With an elegant monochrome set (featuring a stunning nineteen-thirties skyline) by Chris Jones. Directed by Dan Wackerman.”
The New Yorker
"... a sterling revival of an American classic, with a solid cast headed by force of nature John Rubinstein ... heads of institutions who traffic in big-scale revivals ... should study how director Dan Wackerman makes the most of limited resources by casting smartly and sticking to the spirit and letter of the work. Counsellor-At-Law is that rarity among revivals -- an authentic newly found treasure. Rubinstein ... drives Rice’s play as if it were a vintage Mercedes... The production is handsomely designed and although it clocks in at three hours, there’s nary a longeur.”
Time Out New York
[A] “spectacular revival of Elmer Rice’s 1931 Counsellor-At-Law... the casting here is impeccable... Wackerman has turned a sprawling, potentially cumbersome play into a compelling, hugely entertaining evening of theater ... Lanie MacEwan is unusually powerful as Simon’s super-devoted secretary... Robert O’Gorman has a brilliant scene where holds the audience on the edge of its seats with uproarious comedy... Most important, Rubinstein captures all the complexity of Simon and makes his hunger for success oddly, painfully moving... Amy Bradshaw’s costumes are perfection.”
Daily News
“... director Dan Wackerman bring[s] the piece to sparking vitality through direction that emphasizes the strength of Rice’s plot and encourages outstanding performances from his cast members. The ensemble cast features great performances, especially David Lavine, a young communist brutalized by police, and Beth Glover as Simon’s newly acquired trophy (and gentile) wife, but the real gem in this production lies in the performance of Rubinstein as Simon.”
New York Post
“Entertaining... [Rubinstein is] electric [and has] unquenchable energy!”
Newark Star Ledger
“It’s the kind of play -- and the kind of production -- that you long to see on Broadway!”
Talkin' Broadway
“I’ve grown accustomed to being totally delighted by Peccadillo... Dan Wackerman has a golden knack... this one is a solid, solid winner!”
BroadwayWorld.com
Bank Street Theatre
October, 2003
[Jane is] “sparkingly directed by Dan Wackerman with a great sense of comedic pace and eye for telling gesture. The play is packed with sharp one-liners that expose the reverberant shallowness of the characters social world... Mort Kroos ... and Roland Johnson... create a comic snap on a par with the script at its best.”
The New Yorker
“... Jane proves to have held up remarkably well--blessed with charm, grace, and wit.... [The actors] were great fun to watch and listen to in the leading roles. Much of the needed ambiance was created by Chris Jones’ lovely setting...”
Back Stage
“[A] splendid revival... [a] delectable 1952 comedy about some WASPs living in London in the late ‘30s. All of the characters... are so amusingly upper crust...”
Theatremania.com
“Given the state of contemporary theatre economics, it is companies such as the Peccadillo... that have earned and deserve the support of the theatre-going public.”
CurtainUp.com
Bank Street Theatre
May, 2003

13th Street Theatre
September - October, 2005
“... As unyielding and coruscating a portrait of women before feminism as I have ever seen. Leading a cast of 14, Susan Jeffries is heart-breaking in the rapture of love with a younger man, and in Jo Anne Cunningham’s Connie, you see the vulnerability in the tough career woman... It’s difficult to keep an audience laughing when wisecracks are all that hold you back from the abyss, but under Dan Wackerman’s direction, The Peccadillo’s production never falters.”
New York Times
[The Ladies of the Corridor] is “a remarkable 1953 play… Peggy Cowles gives a gripping performance as a genteel matron who blackmails her middle-aged son... Patricia Randell is riveting as an alcoholic wife who fled her philandering husband, and Susan Jeffries is painful to watch, but excellent, as a widow who ruins a romance with a much younger man--well played by Kelly AuCoin... Directed with Mankiewicz flair by Dan Wackerman.”
The New Yorker
“The ladies are all marvelous with Libby George hat-pin sharp as a Southern fried kleptomaniac.”
Time Out New York
“Parker’s trademark acerbic wit is evident throughout this well-acted revival.”
Daily News
“Artistic Director Dan Wackerman… has done a solid job with this drama. His cast is impeccable and he has allowed the play to stand on its own merits without any intrusive directorial touches. The Eisenhower era is beautifully evoked…”
Back Stage
“[Peggy Cowles as Grace Nichols...] “has a Victorian elegance, and her face is a fine-tuned canvas that conveys each emotional pitch to perfection. Chris Jones’ somber set and Amy C. Bradshaw’s costumes define the period to perfection...”
Show Business Weekly
“... a beautiful and touching production. The lyricism of Dan Wackerman’s direction and the riveting performances by every member of the cast make this one of the best things to see on any stage right now.”
Gay City News
Bank Street Theatre
October, 2002
“Sheer old-fashioned stylishness... lusciously lurid... this new production [of The Shanghai Gesture]... provides an oportunity to see what all the early uproar and outrage were about... Jade Wu delivers a formidable performance... more atmospheric musical entertainment is to be found here than at Flower Drum Song. With Mother God Damn around, nights need not be dull.”
New York Times
“Brian Linden gives a remarkable, attuned and nuanced performance as Ceasar-Hawkins, essentially Mother God Damn's servant... The fine Jade Wu as Mother God Damn delivers a glittering and impressive... performance, exactly as called for by the script.”
CurtainUp.com
“Beautifully acted… [The Shanghai Gesture is] “handsomely presented… [by]… the estimable Peccadillo company.”
New York Blade
“Wackerman… [gets] a fiery performance from Jade Wu as Mother God Damn. Richard Bekins plays… Sir Guy Charteris with both the lust and the detached coldness the character requires.”
New York Resident
Bank Street Theatre
July, 2002
“O’Hara was known for his dialogue, and the banter [in Veronique] is swift, clever, and revealing of character. In the astute hands of both director and cast, the play moves like a streamlined train.”
Back Stage
“[John O’Hara’s Veronique] “paints a bright intense picture of a vanished [Greenwich] Village.”
New York Post
“Veronique is being given a deft... compelling production... The play crackles with witty, expert, authentic-seeming dialogue...”
Irish Echo
Bank Street Theatre
October, 2001
“… so passionate that it [All God’s Chillun Got Wings] brought tears to my eyes… Off Off-Broadway at it’s best.”
Back Stage
[All God’s Chillun Got Wings is]…”refreshingly reconceived… beautifully rendered… a gem.”
Irish Echo
Bank Street Theatre
March, 2001
[Dawn Powell’s Jig Saw is] “… energetically directed… a competent, attractive cast.”
New York Times
“Director Dan Wackerman has assembled all the elements of a first-rate revival [of Jig Saw].”
Village Voice
“The Peccadillo Theater Company has just opened a sparkling revival of Dawn Powell’s 1934 satire Jig Saw… this production glitters like bright snow treacherously melting in winter light. Letty is played with edgy brilliance by Susan Jeffries.”
Back Stage
Bank Street Theatre
August, 2000
“Smart and well-paced… Younger audiences will likely be surprised to learn it is not a new play.”
CurtainUp.com
“Well-acted, fantastically danced, and beautifully designed… The audience was so pleased with it… a few members gave it a standing ovation.”
Show Business Weekly
Bank Street Theatre
September, 1999
“Nicole Ravenna delivers a vivacious and energetic performance as April… Philip Levy finds a way to make the unscrupulous Hollywood huckster Harry Hubris a genuinely comic figure.”
New York Times
“Congratulations to Dan Wackerman for imaginatively reviving S. J. Perelman’s rococo comedy.”
Village Voice
[The Beauty Part is] “… more fun than a barrel of Monkey Business.”
Show Business Weekly
“One of off Off-Broadway’s most creative theatrical outfits.”
Encore Magazine
Kraine Theatre
July, 1997
“The best of Off Off-Broadway for 1997”
Back Stage
“… brilliantly revived… masterly presented… The audience was completely mesmerized… [Carl] Cofield is a marvelous actor. His portrayal of Eben is unforgettable.”
Amsterdam News
“… brilliantly revived… masterly presented… The audience was completely mesmerized… [Carl] Cofield is a marvelous actor. His portrayal of Eben is unforgettable.”
Amsterdam News
Kraine Theatre
February, 1997
“Most Innovative revival for 1997”
New York Press
“This great archeological discovery [In A Garden] should have had all of New York knocking at the door.”
Back Stage
“The directorial choice that really blew us away this season... was Wackerman’s decision to line the doorsills and window frames on the set for Phillip Barry’s meta-drawing-room-comedy In a Garden with lines and phrases from the play.”
New York Press
Phil Bosakowski Theatre
November, 1995
“The play was cast extremely well, and the director was adroit in helping actors energize their roles... Gayle Kelly Landers... was outstanding.”
Off Off Broadway Review
“Kahn has a flair for the snappy, rapid-fire dialogue of classic screwball. [Dan Wackerman]... keeps the action going at a good, brisk pace...”
New York Resident
Kraine Theatre
May, 1995
The Silver Cord is fascinating and fun… Dan Wackerman has directed with an impeccable sense of style; and the actors are beautifully and richly costumed by Susan Soetaert.”
Back Stage
[Peccadillo’s production of The Silver Cord] “…ropes you in… Its madness is just realism with a bit of mascara.”
Daily News
“Dan Wackerman’s direction is excellent; he places and moves his actors with admirable subtley throughout.”
Michael's Thing
Kraine Theatre
February, 1995
[Tiny Closets] “...comes to a stunning climax…. Shocking even by today’s standards. Dale Carman is sensationally good…”
Back Stage
Kraine Theatre
December, 1994
“Fascinating… [Peccadillo’s production Strange Interlude is] a radical rethinking of O’Neill’s… psychologi-cal marathon.
Irish Echo